Monday, August 11, 2014

Oral Cancer Patients In Sri Lanka Are On The Increase Due To The Chewing Of Tobacco And Areco Nuts -UPDATED

Oral Cancer Became the  Number One Killer Cancer among Sri Lankan Males due to the chewing of Tobacco and Are co nuts according to the local Oncologists .Out of all cancers in Sri Lanka  13.3% are oral cancers a newest national oral survey has been revealed.


According to the national  survey done on 2007 ,1813 Oral Cancer Patients have been reported from the country and out of that number 1415 patients are males.Around 70% of these patients are in their last stage of the cancers it has been revealed.

As the oral cancers are high among local   males especially within the low incoming community,who are having the  bad habit of chewing tobacco and areco nuts with betel leaves Oncologists have urged those to seek treatment soon after  they developed symptoms inside their mouth  . A large number of Oral Cancer patients are seeking medical treatment in the last stage of the cancer due to their inability to commit a day off from their work for treatment as they are involved in  work based on daily pay it has been revealed.

 Around 28 Cancer Agents in Tobacco and 4 Alcoloides contained in Areco nuts are identified
as the causes for the oral cancers .A white or Red spots appeared  inside the mouth  ,red areas appeared inside the mouth,irritation and inability of opening the mouth are among the major symptoms of oral cancer.


A Row Of Houses Had Been Destroyed Due To A Sudden Fire At Dawson Street

A fire broke out at a Housing Scheme in Dawson Street ,Slave Island(Colombo)  few hours ago had destroyed a row of Houses situated there according to the Police.The fire brigade arrived at the scene managed to doused the fire but at that time dozens of houses in the scheme 47/5 watta had been already destroyed .


The cause of the fire has not yet known ,but it is widely  believed that it may have originated  in a Tyre Store nearby .

OCEANS RUNNING OUT OF OXYGEN AS TEMPERATURES ARISE

https://www.bbc.com/news/science- environment-50690995